How To Read Audiogram Results | Clearly Hearing | Clearly Hearing
Steve W

How To Read Audiogram Results

An audiogram is used to plot the softest sounds you are able to hear and forms a graphical representation of a your hearing health. The amount of information recorded on an audiogram will vary based on how many tests your examiner chooses to perform.  This section is designed to give you a basic understanding in reading an audiogram and understanding audiogram results.

Reading an Audiogram?

The air-conduction exam (the test when you are wearing headphones and listening to beeps) is presented at 250Hz, 500 Hz, 1000Hz, 1500Hz, 2000Hz, 3000Hz, 4000Hz, 6000Hz and 8000Hz.  These numbers (measured in Hz) represent the frequencies (pitches) of the sounds presented during air-conduction testing. They can be thought of as keys on a piano ranging from the bass notes (250 Hz) to the treble notes (8000 Hz).

On the left and right side of the graph below there are numbers from -10 to 110. These numbers (measured in dB) represent the intensity (loudness) of the sound presented.

What the symbols on the graph mean:

The symbols represent the quietest level you responded at each frequency (pitch) during the hearing test.

The 'X's' are the responses for the left ear
The '0's' are the responses for the right ear

 The audiogram results above illustrates a high frequency hearing loss.  We would categorize this hearing loss as: Normal hearing in the low tones, sloping to a severe hearing loss in the middle and high frequencies.  The above high frequency hearing loss is best fit with an Open-fit hearing aid, meaning our SmartAid Digital and SmartAid Digital Premium are the best choices.

Categories of Hearing

Normal Hearing  is defined as hearing thresholds in the range -10 to 25 dB
Mild Hearing Loss  is defined as hearing thresholds in the range 25 to 40 dB
Moderate Hearing Loss  is defined as hearing thresholds in the range 40-55 dB
Moderately-Severe Hearing Loss  is defined as hearing thresholds in the range 55-70 dB
Severe Hearing Loss  is defined as hearing thresholds in the range 70-90 dB
Profound Hearing Loss  is defined as hearing thresholds in the range 90 dB+

 

Your audiogram may show additional information that isn't plotted on the audiogram above.  This information can explain more detail about how your ear works, but isn't utilized when we program your hearing aids. This information may include:

Bone Conduction   Tests response of inner ear, helps determine if hearing loss is sensorineural or conductive in nature.
Speech Reception (SRT) A test to determine the lowest level of speech you can understand.
Most Comfortable Level (MCL) A test to determine the decibel level that you find speech to be the most comfortable to listen to in a quiet environment.
Uncomfortable level (UCL) A test to determine the decibel level that you find speech to be uncomfortably loud.

 

IMPORTANT: A hearing test should be performed by a qualified Hearing Aid Dispenser, Audiologist or Ear Doctor.

If you would like us to provide an interpretation of your audiogram results, including a recommendation of the best hearing aid design and technology to choose to aid your hearing loss, you can submit a copy of your audiogram to our team of hearing professionals.  

Email: audiogram@clearlyhearing.com

Fax: 1-855-263-4327    

(Make sure you include your phone number or email so that we can follow-up with you)

 

 
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